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NINE RODS

Nine Rods

nine rods

                          The Sire and the Dame

The active and passive archetypal energies within the family are called the Sire and Dame respectively.    The Sire represents all that is culturally and historically associated with the marshaling of energy applied towards achieving a purpose while the Dame is associated with being conscientious and aligning choices so that whatever happens is effortless.

 

Men and women have their biological roles as fathers and mothers, sons, and daughters, but these relationships are empty containers.  The Sire and the Dame provide a structure so the social constructs that fill those containers can be used as a predictor of behavior.  The Sire and Dame can serve as a projection screen for all those beliefs and practices of masculine and feminine prerogative that are widely attributed to men and women throughout the world.    The Sire or Dame is not a person or even roles people play, but a container for a set of complementary energy forms which reside at the heart of all the roles identified with men and women.     From this men and women derive their sense of privileges and responsibilities as adult family members.  These get translated into generic roles that are then adapted to a personal context of necessary and preferential tasks.  Men and women apply themselves to that list of tasks, sometimes completely unaware of the source of the template that defines their limiting beliefs about what is possible.

 

The House of Rods

The Tarot cards that depict leafy branches in various uses and places are known as the “House of Rods.”  The cards point towards the success of an individual measured in terms of the alignment of their choices with their adult roles within their family.  Harnessing the archetypal energies for success in the roles means surfing waves of potential self-serving egotistical outcomes to find the right combination of actions and acceptance that produces behavior aligned with obligations.

It takes a conscious application of intentions, mastery of skills, and willingness to ask for assistance to satisfy the obligation.   The execution of the role is never easy.   In the moment when decision are made there can be numerous internal conflicts about what is needed, there is often external subterfuge by those that have different agendas, and there are always distractions that point to dead ends and blind allies that lead nowhere.   Not only does the energy of the Sire and Dame need to be supplied and controlled in skillful application it must also be the right combination of contradicting forces that must be applied in the proper proportion.   Men and women are rewarded or punished according to agreements that are embedded in archetypes of the Sire and Dame that create roles for marriage partners, parents, and in relations between siblings, but the final results are not always known or understood in the moment that fateful decisions are being made.

Every adult male member of a family has a mission or purpose that transcends the daily affairs and moment to moment choices he makes in life.   Through a process of initiations and rites of passage men become the embodiment of transcendent agreements embedded in the roles into which they must fit their personalities.   Roles are the portals into a system of prioritizing the obligations the individual must fulfill indifferent to the preferences they may express for an alternative course.   Within every family the alignment of the man’s choices with the requirements of his role in the family has the power to evoke emotion, call forth actions, and force prostration to the agreements which perpetuate the family and life itself.

As a male child he will be born and bred into the family Sire through stories about masculine responsibilities that can be traced back through time from father to grandfather.   From infancy through adolescence and into adulthood male family members are ensconced in a vestibular calculus of the meaning and purpose of the many titles that are applied to their parochial obligations.   A surname becomes synonymous with that set of entitlements and responsibilities that are codified in a belief system that will guide him in expressing his roles as he matures in his manhood.  The translation of those beliefs into actions and his accountability for his impact on the family defines his manhood.  As an adult he embodies the Sire in his House of Rods when he carries his namesake into marriage and when he bestows it on the next generation.

 

A single card drawn from House of Rods can be either be a doorway into an archetypal energy, or the idealized role of that energy, or the character the man is expressing through the tasks that engage him.    The same card can represent all three levels so it can indicate roles molded to one particular expression of that archetype, and at the same time it can represent the tasks performed by a man measuring up to the requirements of his role.   A card can inform several levels of interpretation revealing something of the grand design of the human condition as well as giving specific information about entirely personal affairs involving a current, past or future life expression of a that person’s experience of the role they are playing.

The information within the reading can be used as a calibration device to take the measure of the man or woman.  Organizing a sequence of cards can tell stories about the evolution of the role through time, make predictions about near term events, or can give prescriptive advice about the future course that is unfolding by the dictates of ontology.

Each of the cards is symbolic of an episode or relationship paradigm where a shared belief system within a family has come to define the obligations and methods of accountability used by family members.  The choice of what to focus on in the reading is made based on the resonance with the requirements associated the roles and a measure of their alignment with the perceived entitlements and obligations.   The focal point of the reading traces the echoes of success and failure to align with the ideal that has reverberated within a lifetime and across generations.  Actions, choices, and relationships in contradiction with the mandates of adult responsibilities irritate deep emotional wounds and reveal abuses of power.  Failures in the development process show up in all manner of misdirected intentions.  The Tarot cards attenuate to the emotional drama by offering a way to examine the deeper meaning through a peripheral doorway in the form of the stories told through the characters in the House of Rods.

The wooden staff or rod stands for the principles, beliefs, and conscious or unconscious assumptions of the family members.  People depicted in the cards are symbolic of roles, behavioral patterns, and relationships.  The emotional character, tone, body language, actions, and objects are symbolic of tasks and the performance of duties both aligned and in contradiction to expectations.

# 59

The Nine of Rods:  The Dreamer

In male adolescence a boy can easily become possessed by his idyllic fantasies of masculine prowess and entitlement.   Based on the affections, love, and spiritual inspirations he has derived from his boyhood relationship with his mother he has created an internal world view that gives him emotional privileges that are untenable now that his sexual appetites have been awakened and his mother can no longer comfortably display her affection or pet with him in asexual intimacy.   The result is that late pubescent boys often decidedly portend the attitude of the withdrawn rebel.  They become nonconformist and attach themselves with belligerent or iconic antiestablishment thoughts and actions that repel real world connections and allow them to remain in their isolated bubble of beliefs about relationship dynamics.  To prove his beliefs about manhood are true and correct he pursues choices in contradiction to his mother’s regulatory restraint and acts in ways that show his displeasure with his restricted access to mother’s comfort and touch.  This card depicts just such an adolescent boy who is constantly in a state of emotional upset and turmoil as he tries to express his dreamy ideals in choice and action.   Rebuffed, deterred, and frustrated when he finds that no one else shares his vision or supports his attempts to impose a new and better order on the organizational structure of the family he stands in a dull stare of disbelief that nobody loves him the way he wants to be loved.   By the time he reaches his late teens nothing that he has dreamed seems to be working out as he thought it should.  He has become hypersensitive to the breakdown of his emotional paradigm and overreacts to the slightest provocation of his will.  The powers of his emotions have not yet been aligned with adult responsibilities that he flatly rejects as unnecessary.   He has a stern quality that may be disgust, angst, or hubris.  The set jaw denotes his heroic self-image but not necessarily fortitude, empathy, or wisdom.  The bandages indicate some hard knocks.  He looks brow beaten, but he is not defeated, just unsure where to place his stake or how he fits in the scheme of family relationships that defines adult male responsibilities.   The rod in his hand is the name sake of his House of Rods and the emblem he can use to define himself if he so chooses.  He will attack anyone who insults his pride, but he is absolutely convinced that the emotional paradigm of adult responsibilities will never be satisfactory and as soon as he is able he will invent or create a world order to his own specifications.   The erect rods at his back symbolize his mother’s beliefs about the man she hope he will eventually become, even as such ideals are largely without context for the boy, and are currently the very things for which he stands in opposition.

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Inventory of the Fool, Eight of Swords, and Star

The understanding of the Shamanic Tarot begins with your reactions to the tarot cards, so your response and comments on the blog are most welcome!

First, a bit of Tarot wisdom on the Eight of Swords, a card that uses sight and seeing as a metaphor.

Reactive, Predictive, and Prescriptive Readings of the Tarot

A reactive reading requires seeing what has been.

A predictive reading requires foresight for what must be.

A prescriptive reading requires insight to what might be.

Reacting to what has happened is relatively simple.

Predicting the future is a parlor trick.

Changing the future is the purpose of Shamanic mastery.

The Shamanic Tarot gains its power by demanding a kind of discipline of the adherents.  To get the value you must be willing to take your “inventory” which in shamanic terms, means organizing your thoughts and experiences by type and frequency.

To do an inventory means having some criteria for understanding how to put thoughts and experiences in groups.

A single experience is called an “eccentric.”

When something happens twice, it is called a “duality.”  Dualities can be sympathetic or contradictory.  Most dualities contain both a sympathetic and a contradictory indication.  Knowing both sides is part of the inventory.

When something happens three times, it is called a “synthesis.”  In synthesis a duality is resolved by leaning towards a particular resolution or elimination of a contradiction with a more palatable harmony.

When something happens four times is a pattern.  Patterns are all around us.  The intention of the inventory is to catalog the patterns.

The prescriptive role of the Shamanic Tarot is to change the patterns.

THE Fool, the Eight of Swords, and the Star

Fools make foolish choices.  At the edge of a cliff he appears reckless and dangerous.   In whatever task or job a Fool is a person who lacks the self-evident awareness of the conditions or circumstances of their situation.  A blindfold and bindings are universal symbols of things being hidden from view, a restriction of sight and movement, or some form of imprisonment.     A Star can foretell one’s fortune and has long been associated with luck.

From these universal meanings the cards give an indication of qualitative measures of thought and decision making associated with roles and goals.   This is the place to start developing criteria for inventory.

When have you played the Fool?

Where are you stuck, bound, and blinded?

For what do you thank your lucky stars?

Take some time to take your inventory.  Five minutes a day for week, 15 minutes once a week for month.   It doesn’t matter how long you take.  Give yourself enough time to think deeply and let the associations percolate until the dualities become synthesis and patterns emerge.

I suggest using a three column chart with the Fool, Eight of Swords, and Star at the top, make a list of experience and thoughts about various times in your life when you have been a fool, been bound and blindfolded, and when you have had good fortune.   Put together the list, send it to me, and then we can go to the next step in the reading.

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The Fool, Eight of Swords, and The Star

The Fool, Eight of Swords, and The Star

The Three Card Reading
The Tarot reading is divided into three parts. Each part looks at your identification with your beliefs and practices from the perspective of motivational forces that control your ability make changes in your life circumstances.
The first card corresponds to a role you are playing. This is the aspect of the self that is most directly identified with the action, events, and circumstances of your life that you identify as being your job or duty.
The Fool
With a Scintillating Intelligence
Walking Along a High Mountain Path under a Bright White Sun
The card depicts a snapshot like image of innocence as a blond androgynous youth taking a step towards a windswept precipice.
The second card or self-body is identified with your mind, or cognitive function. This is the aspect of self that establishes meaning and determines the value or worth of the actions and circumstances in your life. This is the card that helps you understand the meaning and purpose of the role you are playing and holds the role in its proper order to the cosmos.
Eight of Swords
Bound and Blindfolded
Perplexity at Cause
Perplexity stands on a murky shoreline surrounding her with eight menacing swords that are stuck in the ground creating a barrier to motion right or left.
The third card carries information about the reflexive or reactive emotions. This is aspect of the self that responds immediately to situations and conditions with self-interest, self-preservation, and immediate gratification of any perceived need, want, or desire.
The Star
Blissful Awakening
Easy Answers and the Saint of Circumstance
Our Saint is a blond maiden posed naked and kneeling by the side of a lush oasis with two judges from which she pours and endless stream of blue water. She intensifies our feelings of blissful peace as she is among the fertile gardens in her most natural state. It is as if she is in an oasis of creative, inspiration that serves as a place of healing and renewal.

The Squire and the Sire

The House of Rods

The Tarot cards that depict wooden staffs in various uses, places, and with different people are known as “House of Rods.”  The cards point towards the success of an individual measured in terms of their alignment with the roles and goals that are broadly defined by their family relationships.   Actors are rewarded or punished according to agreements that are embedded in pretext of marriage, child rearing, and relations between the generations.

Each family has a “mission” or purpose that transcends the daily affairs and moment to moment choices made by the individual members of that family.   The mission of the family provides a teleological explanation for the structure in which the various actors must fit their personalities.  Roles are created to serve the family in completing its mission indifferent to the preferences of the actors.   Within every family institutions have evolved that are given the power to enforce the agreements that perpetuate the family and life itself.

Card Reading from the House of Rods

Each of the cards is symbolic of an episode or relationship paradigm where a shared belief system within a family defines the obligations and methods of accountability of family members.  The actions based on the beliefs system creates echoes that reverberate within a lifetime and across generations.  The Tarot cards attenuate the echoes by focusing attention on the details of the story they tell.

A two card reading contains the energy of a polarity or dynamic quality of relationship, either between two family members or within an individual working out a resolution for some desired result.  Sometimes the energy is manifested as polar opposites, like north and south or hot and cold, even male and female, but more often the energies are not so much about opposing forces as the balance of forces for resolution of some difficult or troubling matter.   In the Tarot scheme of things the focus of the reading tends towards a balance in the outcome.  For every action there is some opposite reaction being called forth that will balance the energy.  The cards illuminate how this balance may be achieved, sometimes with a zot on the head.

 The Page of Rods                and             The KING OF RODS

The male archetype within the family is called the Sire.    The Sire represents all that is culturally and historically associated with a masculine character and the responsibilities of manhood.  When embodied as the father, son, uncle, or in surrogate form, the Sire stands as the container and the projection screen for all those beliefs and practices of masculine prerogative that are widely attributed to men throughout the world.  The Sire is not a person or even a role, but a set of ideals that reside at the heart of all the roles identified with men.  The Sire can be used as a calibration device to take the measure of the man. 

 

The House of Rods is the container for the expression of the Sire archetype within a family over many generations.   Within this House there are many doorways into the male and female archetypes and the roles for men and women in marriage and family dynamics.

When embodied, he is the male heir to the legacy in the paternal lineage, first playing the role as the son in one generational cycle then taking the mantle in the role as a father in the next cycle.   In each role he acts out his script using the template of the previous generation to define success or failure.  To chart his course the cards call forth the excesses of each type masculine expression and then counter balances them like correcting the gyrations of a wobbly projectile.

          The Squire and the Sire of the House of Rods

The cards depict two men of the House of Rods.  The Squire stands erect and slightly titling back to raise his head as if preparing to make an announcement.   The King is seated on his throne.   Both men wear the garb of the family regalia.   The King has a crown and head dress, the Squire wears a tin bowler with a feather plume.    Each wears a robe that is a ceremonial indicator of their status in the family hierarchy.  The King’s robe has a train that is extends over his seat and several feet behind him.  When seated it provides comfort, but requires an attendant for walking and prohibits vigorous activity.  The Squire has a smaller version of the same green robe without the embellishment of a neck constraining tunic.  The Squire can wrap his robe around his shoulder and move freely with little impedance from his clothing.

 

The leafing staff that bestows the authority of the family name on the bearer is in prominent display as is the totem animal, the lizard or salamander, which has been on the family crest since ancient times.   Father and Son, these men bear a striking resemblance to each other, yet they drawn a contrast that is both subtle and profound.  The King has a remote expression on his nearly featureless face that reveals neither emotion nor intention.  His son is equally unexpressive, but in this moment he is marshaling an impulse to yell something of great importance into the vast open space of the wilderness in which he finds himself.

 

4/12/12

The Squire of Rods and his King

Impulsive Youth and the Disaffected Provider

In the Baker family myth the rise from poverty can be attributed to two things; an enduring faith in the redeeming capacity of the Christian Protestant values, and the unlimited willingness to sacrifice immediate or short term gratification in the name of worthy long term goals and purposes.

The mission of the Baker family is to raise children to be economically productive adults in the mold of the Protestant traditions of self-sufficiency, thrift, hard work, and stoic sacrifice.  According to this philosophy the children must be trained to suppress their impulses and channel their focused attention on long term success.

My parent’s saw their role was to provide external control of the children’s impulses until the children mastered the self-control necessary for productive adult life.  The role of the Baker children was to revere the values and master the skill set associated with controlling impulses.    The Baker parents were models of these behavioral choices and the techniques they used to control their impulses and desires were passed along in the genetic mix, often with unintended consequences.

My father spent his lifetime providing home and comfort for the Baker family. He worked long hours.  For all the years I lived under his roof he was gone from the house before dawn, returned to eat dinner with the family at 6:30 pm, and then retired to his study for additional paperwork.  Saturdays were spent at the tennis club.  Sunday was church in the morning and tennis in afternoon. He was disciplined in his work habits, rigorous in his exercise, religious in his doctrine, and disaffected by emotional nuisances.

Like the King who keeps a stiff control of temperaments in the House of Rods, my father’s prerogative was for as little emotional excitement as possible in the Baker home. My father’s vision of the family home was it was a place of uninterrupted tranquility and calm and orderly routines of quiet cleanliness that are the hallmarks of modern prosperity.   A lizard is a symbol of passions and dreams, dreams that endlessly swallow themselves as the King holds court with no one in particular.

 

My father made sacrifices for me.  He gave up his dreams so I could have the best educational opportunities available.  When our family moved, we moved because he wanted me in a better school.  When he insisted I conform with comports of affluence it was because the appearance of prosperity opens doors of opportunity. To someone in his position, the rewards of playing along seemed self-evident.

 

Just like the King sitting on his throne my father guided the family with the judicious hand of man whose identity was forged by the club of rational assessments, not inclined by the whim of the philosophical or the musings of the hyper-emotional.  Perhaps the Squire is similarly identified with his own controlled emotions that could fill the empty space from eternity all the way back to the throne room.

 

Family Life at the Baker Home

I attended high school from 1971 to 1975.    My high school years at the Baker home were very uncomfortable for the actors.  I had “gone rouge” and had taken the family deep in the weeds, far from the script that my parents had rehearsed when they raised my sister and successfully launched her on to college.   I was heading in a different direction.   As I strayed far from the expectations laid out in the game plan my parents were terrified and appalled by the heresy of my choices.

One of my father’s favorite things to tell me was that if I would just do everything he dictated I would the mistakes of youthful indiscretion.   In my father’s mind, if I just followed his advice I could skip adolescence all together and become a perfectly balanced adult by the time I graduated from high school.  In the logic of his mind if I would stop being so emotional and get to work on my studies it would give me a big leg up in life.   His advice was that I should grow up as fast as possible because the sooner I joined the work force as a productive member of society the happier I would be.

In the Archetype of the Sire in the Baker House

Masculine Roles:

The Son

The Father

The Student

The Sage

The Stoic

The Martyr

The Protector

The Provider

The Heavy

Male Behavioral Strategies

Disappointment

Disaffection

Self-control

Feigned Emotion

Hard Work

Faith

Wordless Arguments

Verbal Assaults

An Example of a Single Card Reading “King of Wands”

The House of Rods

The Tarot cards that depict wooden staffs in various uses, places, and with different people are known as “House of Rods.”  The cards point towards the success of an individual measured in terms of their alignment with a role within their family.   Actors are rewarded or punished according to agreements that are embedded in pretext of marriage, child rearing, and relations between the generations.

Each family has a “mission” or purpose that transcends the daily affairs and moment to moment choices made by the individual members of that family.   The mission of the family provides a teleological explanation for the structure in which the various actors must fit their personalities.  Roles are created to serve the family in completing its mission indifferent to the preferences of the actors.   Within every family institutions have evolved that are given the power to enforce the agreements that perpetuate the family and life itself.

The Single Card Reading from the House of Rods

Each of the cards is symbolic of an episode or relationship paradigm where a shared belief system within a family defines the obligations and methods of accountability of family members.  The actions based on the beliefs system creates echoes that reverberate within a lifetime and across generations.  The Tarot cards attenuate the echoes by focusing attention on the details of the story they tell.

KING OF RODS

      Sire of the House of Rods

 

The male archetype within the family is called the Sire.    The Sire represents all that is culturally and historically associated with a masculine character and the responsibilities of manhood.  When embodied as the father, son, uncle, or in surrogate form, the Sire stands as the container and the projection screen for all those beliefs and practices of masculine prerogative that are widely attributed to men throughout the world.  The Sire is not a person or even a role, but a set of ideals that reside at the heart of all the roles identified with men.  The Sire is the calibration device by which all can take the measure of the man.

 

    

The card depicts a man of the Royal House of Rods seated on the throne of the King.  He wears the garb of the King. The crown, robe, and head dress, along with the gold pendant image of the lion necklace are the ceremonial indicators of the status he portrays.  In his right hand he holds the leafing staff that bestows authority.  The totem animals of the lion and lizard are represented on the back of his chair and his robe.  A lizard stands sentry at his left side.  He has a remote expression on his nearly featureless face that reveals neither emotion nor intention.

 

2/13/12

The Stoic Provider

My House of Rods, the Baker namesake, consists of that set of beliefs that has guided me in my role as a man in my familial relationships regardless of the apparent happiness or distress it has caused me or any of my other family members.    As a male child, I was born and bred into the Baker family mission that can be traced back through time me to my father to my grandfather.

My own father spent his lifetime providing home and comfort for the Baker family. He worked long hours.  For all the years I lived under his roof he was gone from the house before dawn, returned to eat dinner with the family at 6:30 pm, and then retired to his study for additional paperwork.  Saturdays were spent at the tennis club, where I was invited but never took to the sport. Sunday was church in the morning and tennis in afternoon.

 

My father was quite intentional in creating a regimented sterile world of professional associations, casual acquaintances, and following the path of least emotional drama.  In fact, like the throne room for the King of Rods, there wasn’t much excitement in the Baker home. My father’s vision of the family home was it was a place of uninterrupted tranquility and calm and orderly routines of quiet cleanliness that are the hallmarks of modern prosperity.   A lizard is a symbol of dreams, dreams endlessly swallowing themselves as the King holds court with no one in particular.

 

The Baker “Protestant” Family Myth

My father tells a story that the Baker name got it origin several hundred years ago when the town baker ran off with a milk maid.

While I am not inclined to put too much credence into this family legend I do know that my paternal grandfather was delivery man for the Wonder Corporation.  He had no formal education past the eighth grade.   In the 1930’s and 40’s that type of job would have been blue collar work, long hours, low pay, and with little opportunity for advancement.   My father, no doubt, recognized his father was in a kind of prison that had no exit for elder Baker.  In my father’s youth the exit route for him and everyone in his generation was clearly through education.  My father realized this at a young age and his focus and discipline as a student in a tough urban high school were often repeated in the family lore.  My father was legendary for his academic merit.  An excellent student all his young life, the doorways really opened up for him with the GI bill which kicked in in his late twenties after his service in World War II.   At 25 he was set on a course to the university and a career in science and medicine.   He escaped the prison of his father’s life and rather than getting caught in the dredge of menial labor he became a world renowned scientist.  My grandfather died of a heart attack when he was in his 50’s.  The story I always was told was that a hard life killed him young.

My parent’s resonated with the cultural story of the World War II generation’s rise from poverty to the middle class by way of the GI Bill and the fable of raising oneself up by one’s own bootstraps.    In this mythology heroic stories are told of ancestral men and women who had risen from disadvantaged origins to become proud and successful members of the middle class.

In the Baker myth this rise from poverty can be attributed to two things; an enduring faith in the redeeming capacity of the Christian Protestant values, and the unlimited willingness to sacrifice immediate or short term gratification in the name of worthy long term goals and purposes.

The mission of the Baker family was to raise children to be economically productive adults in the mold of the Protestant traditions of self-sufficiency, thrift, hard work, and stoic sacrifice.

The role of the Baker parents was to provide a family environment of these values so the children could most quickly develop the skill set of economic productivity.  The role of the Baker children was to revere the values and master the skill set.

The task set for the Baker parents was to execute a lesson plan for the children in a sequence of age appropriate directives.  At each stage of social and intellectual development of the children the Baker parents were to devise such reward and punishment protocols that made the lessons they were teaching the children produce automatic and reflexive habits of thought and action in children’s behavioral repertoire that were consistent with the overall objective of socializing the children according to the plan.

The task of the Baker children was to learn the lessons in an age appropriate way and progress to the next lesson.

All of this while maintaining the stiff pursed lip of the King holding court, not in the least concerned about the world beyond the throne room, and in no way tolerating interruptions, schedule changes, and deviations from the plan.

In the Archetype of the Sire in the Baker House

Masculine Roles:   The King of Rods

The Son

The Dad

The Father

Student

Male Behavioral Strategies

The Stoic

The Martyr

The Disappointed

Feigned Happiness

Feigned Ignorance

The Kight and King of Wands

The House of Rods

The Tarot cards that depict wooden staffs in various uses, places, and with different people are known as “House of Rods.”  Each of the cards is symbolic of an episode where a shared belief system within a family has structured the roles and obligations of family members.

Your House of Rods is that set of beliefs that guide your ideas of duty and accountability in your family relationships regardless of the apparent alignment, happiness, or distress of the family members.  Within this House there are many doorways into the male and female archetype and the responsibilities of men and women in marriage and family dynamics.

You are born into a family where a dynamic of parents and siblings shaped your beliefs about men and women and the roles they are expected to play.  Echoes of this shaping process stay with you all your life in the form of a family paradigm.  Those beliefs are the essential to your understanding of of the masculine and feminine roles that you expect everyone to uphold.

 

The psyche is divided into three separate aspects with different functional capacities. Each capacity can rightly be called the “self” in a limited but useful way, but taken individually such a definition of self would be inadequate, since the three functions together as a coherent whole.

The first of these three “self-bodies” is the “doing self.” This is the aspect of the self that is most directly identified with the role, the task, and the action.

The second self-body is the mind, or cognitive function. This is the aspect of self that establishes meaning and determines the value or worth of the actions and circumstances that the “doer” has created.

The third “self-body” carries the reflexive or reactive emotions. This is aspect of the self that responds immediately to situations and conditions with self-interest, self-preservation, and immediate gratification of any perceived need, want, or desire.

Mastery of the psyche is most often associated with the second self-body, or the mind, but the three must work in conjunction with each other. Each has strengths and weakness associated with the function.

The mind reasons and it gains its power by calculation of outcomes. It suffers from bouts of epistemological doubt, and systemic existential crisis.

It is through the body that actions follow choices. Where choices come from or what transcendent meaning they may hold is not exactly known to the actor. What can be selected is exactly what the limits to behavior dictate. This dictation can come from the mind, but is overridden by the brute laws of nature. The ability to take action is its own end. It needs no rational explanation for its existence. While actors gain and loses functional capacity, the actor never has an existential crisis, because of the body cannot comprehend nonexistence.

There is one more actor in this play of the psyche. Call him the emotional body. This is where all instinct lies. It is the primordial animalistic self.

It is self-gratification for its own sake, as a virtue, not to out smarted by a mind unable to fully exploit the strength of instinctive behavior, or its amazing capacity to right action. Only the doing-self, has the power to undo a feedback loop in the instincts that is causing problems. The power of instinctive reactionary capacity is self-evident. The weakness of instinct is it inability to channel action in the name of a specific cause. It builds momentum by responding to its own signals and cannot be governed by ideals unmoored from pleasures, satisfactions, and happiness.

Inventory of “Doer” (the first self-body)

The Sire     (Fatherhood)   JACK OF RODS

The Sovereign  (Power) KING OF RODS

The Citizen (Prosperity)  The Empress

 

Roles in the Archetype of the Sire

The Son

The Lover

The Husband

Behavioral Strategies  of the Sire

Student-

Mate-

Hero-

 

Roles  in the Archetype of the Sovereign

The Priest

The Athlete

The Healer

Behavioral Strategies  Sovereign

Initiate-

Practitioner-

Master-

 

Roles in the Archetype of the Citizen

The Magician

The King

The Salesman

Behavioral Strategies  of the Citizen

Apprentice-

Contractor-

Professional-

 

Inventory of Cognitive Self and the Pursuit of Happiness  (the Second Self-body)

Happiness-  a belief that everything is perfect

Verbal Strategies for Happiness

Judge:  decides what is right and wrong

Counselor:  makes reasonable decisions

Constable:  enforces the rules

Inventory of Cognitive Emotions

Grace-   Acceptance, Forgiveness, and Gratitude  for past events and circumstances

Passion-  An enduring belief about a positive future experience

 

Inventory of the Visceral Emotions  and the Avoidance of Pain  (the Third Self-body)

Sadness- Thoughts about past experiences that were painful in the context of a belief that the wounds can never be healed.

Fear- Thoughts about a future experience that will be hurtful in the context of a belief there is no way to avoid the pain.

Strategies to Avoid  Painful Emotional Experiences

Anger-  Separation from Painful Experience

Victim:  Blaming others for pain and suffering

Psychic:  Justification of pain and suffering

Dictator:  Controlling the causes of pain and suffering

The Sire and the Sovereign

The Sire is the embodiment of the warrior’s spirit that resides at the heart of all the roles identified with the protection of the family.  He is archetype that holds the role of fatherhood and husband.  He is the masculine force that guarantees the perpetuation of the family acted out over a lifetime that stretches in the imagination backwards through the entire paternal linage and forwards to every male descendant that is yet to come.

This card is a symbolic representation the archetype of the Sire in one of his many forms.  Here he is shown as a battle armored warrior charging forward on his steed carrying his staff in one hand and grabbing the reins with the other. Determination grips his young face. He ignores dangers coming from the rear that are trailing him like a flame.  He goes forward with grimace and focused intention on his mission of conquest.  This particular vision of the Sire is the masculine force of nature that defines and sums up all those beliefs about men and masculine roles in the world that explain the lust for conquest and the intention of battle.

The Sovereign shows a different embodiment of masculine roles.  Sovereigns are people whose beliefs and practices exemplify and advocate their own liberty as expressed in their ability to create personal choices and self-determination.     A sovereign is a person actively and consciously practicing at taking responsibility for their life circumstances.  Masters never act like victims.  They neither deny the consequences of their choices, nor blame their experience on others.  They practice being accountable for the impact of every decision and recognize both the intended and unintended consequences of every choice.

 

The King of Rods is one of the manifest forms of the Sovereign.  This man has spent a lifetime providing home and comfort for his family. With the perspective of the King of his Castle, he is the one who has the Wisdom of Solomon.  He is accountable for finding the solutions to those seemingly intractable conflicts within the family.  He is glad in his heart that he has stayed with his family and did not quit during the rough patches.  He made adjustments; he gave up some of his dreams, but he got a lot of benefit from his role in the family.  Today he is a stronger and better man for having gone through some dark times and working through the most difficult situations in his family.

The Three Card Reading (introction to the shamanic principles that guide the cards)

The psyche is divided into three separate aspects with different functional capacities.  Each capacity can rightly be called the “self” in a limited but useful way, but taken individually such a definition of self would be inadequate, since the three functions together as a coherent whole.

The first of these three “self-bodies” is the “doing self.”  This is the aspect of the self that is most directly identified with the role, the task, and the action.

The second self-body is the mind, or cognitive function.  This is the aspect of self that establishes meaning and determines the value or worth of the actions and circumstances that the “doer” has created.

The third “self-body” carries the reflexive or reactive emotions.  This is aspect of the self that responds immediately to situations and conditions with self-interest, self-preservation, and immediate gratification of any perceived need, want, or desire.

 

Mastery of the psyche is most often associated with the second self-body, or the mind, but the three must work in conjunction with each other.   Each has strengths and weakness associated with the function.

The mind reasons and it gains its power by calculation of outcomes.  It suffers from bouts of epistemological doubt, and systemic existential crisis.

It is through the body that actions follow choices.  Where choices come from or what transcendent meaning they may hold is not exactly known to the actor.   What can be selected is exactly what the limits to behavior dictate.  This dictation can come from the mind, but is overridden by the brute laws of nature.  The ability to take action is its own end. It needs no rational explanation for its existence.  While actors gain and loses functional capacity, the actor never has an existential crisis, because of the body cannot comprehend nonexistence.

There is one more actor in this play of the psyche.  Call him the emotional body.  This is where all instinct lies.   It is the primordial animalistic self.

It is self-gratification for its own sake, as a virtue, not to out smarted by a mind unable to fully exploit the strength of instinctive behavior, or its amazing capacity to right action.  Only the doing-self, has the power to undo a feedback loop in the instincts that is causing problems.  The power of instinctive reactionary capacity is self-evident.   The weakness of instinct is it inability to channel action in the name of a specific cause.   It builds momentum by responding to its own signals and cannot be governed by ideals unmoored from pleasures, satisfactions, and happiness.